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Connecting with cards

It’s nothing new really. During WW1 and WW2 sending cards and letters increased from the weekly norm as people tried to keep in touch and boost morale. It’s happening again. Not a world war as such but during this pandemic the British people are turning to post to help lift spirits. Find out how people are connecting with cards during lockdown.

Sending greeting cards – the British way

Recently the ITV reported on the surge in mail that postal workers are experiencing. From 100th birthday cards, correspondence with loved ones and mail sent to those in care homes, the great UK greeting card is out to boost morale again. In ‘normal’ times the UK people send more greeting cards on average than anyone else in the world. With the average person in the UK sending 33 cards a year I think the figures for 2020 will be much, much higher. But we’ll have to wait for the Greeting Card Association annual report in a year or so before we find out exactly how many.

connecting with cards

What does Connecting with Cards mean?

This week is UK Mental Health Awareness Week. Sending and receiving cards has been scientifically proven to help with mental health. I’m not sure we need science to tell us that. We all know the joy of a handwritten letter or card arriving on the doormat. Sending a card is an act of kindness. ‘Kindness’ is the theme for Mental Health Awareness Week 2020. But a handwritten card isn’t just an act of kindness it’s more than that too. It means taking a little time to think about someone else. Writing a card means you’ve thought about someone who quite possible feels very alone. And a beautiful greeting card isn’t easily forgotten. Instead it’s given pride of place to be seen and smiled at again and again and again.

Send a card, deliver a smile.