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10 people you could be Thinking Of this Week

thinking of you week

With Thinking of You Week just around the corner I thought it might be helpful to give some ideas of people you could send your 7 cards to.

1 – Your neighbour

Let’s face it you could send all 7 cards to people in your area and light up the whole neighbourhood with smiles. A little card to say, ‘Thanks for being a great neighbour’ would be lovely don’t you think?

2 – A family member

Who is special to you in your family but you never quite tell them often enough, or maybe they’re so special that you can’t tell them too often. How they’ll smile if you pop a card through their door this week.

3 – Work colleague

Who’s having a tough time at work? Who makes the office more fun and bearable and makes coming to work worthwhile? Send them a note to let them know that work wouldn’t be the same without them.

4 – Secret admiree

Who would you like to talk to but can’t quite pluck up the courage to do so? Or maybe you don’t get the chance without someone else around all the time. Why not send a card, they’ll feel very special and it might just break the ice.

5 – Someone bereaved

Who’s lost a loved one recently, or maybe it’s an anniversary of their loved one’s death? A card to let them know they’re thought of and cared for is a nice touch, especially if it’s a bit awkward to bring it up in conversation.

6 – Your bestie

I know you see them all the time, you talk and text on the phone regularly but I bet they’d love a card from you. It would be unexpected and special.

7 – Your postman

Well why not? They deliver all your mail, be nice if they got one to take home with them wouldn’t it?

8 – The Queen

Now Britain’s longest reigning monarch I bet she’d love a card for no other reason than to say ‘thanks, thought you might like this’.

9 – A celebrity

Well, when else would you have the excuse to send a card to George Clooney/Justin Bieber/Rihanna/Shakira?

10 – ‘Thinking of You’ surprise

You could be really daring and leave a card for someone to find! Check out Share the Love Letters for more on this.

The challenge is to send 7 cards over the course of a week, I’ve given you more than 7 possibilities in case some of the ideas don’t apply or appeal to you. Go on – send some smiles!

For more reasons to send cards read my other blog about being a Mad Hatter

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Artists Wanted!

artists wanted

Ever wondered how Flamingo Paperie find their artists? If you have ever thought your work might look good on a card then you’ll be interested to know that it’s Artists Wanted time.

What sort of artwork fits the Flamingo Paperie artists wanted profile?

Flamingo Paperie artwork is a real mixture of fun, contemporary and fine art. It’s difficult to say exactly what they are looking for because trends and fashions change. The easiest place to start might be to look at our current range to give you an idea.

Or see my latest video with a snapshot of the Christmas range from 2017.

How do I submit my work to Flamingo Paperie?

You can post your artwork to them at Artist Submissions
Flamingo Paperie
60 High Street
Wimbledon Village
SW19 5EE
Or you can email robin@flamingopaperie.co.uk.

Flamingo Paperie will consider ‘paper’ copies of artwork or digital artwork. Though I know first hand that the creative director loves to receive ‘real’ artwork through the post!

What happens after I’ve submitted my artwork?

Once you submit your artwork to Flamingo Paperie, they will send feedback on whether they think your work is what they are looking for. If you are successful then Flamingo Paperie shortlist your work on to a survey that the creative team get to vote on!

So get out those paints and brushes, go on – give it a go! Or pick up the phone and get that artist friend of yours to send her work in. Tell Flamingo I’m the one who told you that there were artists wanted and when you let me know that the artist is successful, I’ll send you something to say thank you. Good luck, hope to see your work in the next product survey!

If you’d like to know more about our current artists then take a look at the artist profiles of Alison Vickery, Alison Hullyer, Julia Rigby and Amanda Loverseed.

View the artists terms and conditions here.

 

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Are you a Mad Hatter?

Greeting cards and stationery for all occasions

In this era of social media, texting and instant messaging, here are 10 reasons to pick up a pen, stick a stamp and send a card. The Mad Hatter may have had the right idea.

10 reasons to be a Mad HatterTF11-Teacups-and-butterflies

Haven’t forgotten you

Good friends starsIt’s been a while since we last spoke, I’ve been busy and didn’t want you to think I had forgotten you. A handwritten card will forgive a lot more non-contact than a FB msg, take the extra minute to write a card.

Saw this and thought of you

Fun with gardening Your friend loves gardening and you saw this great card they’d love. Send it! Don’t just look and think “I know who’d appreciate that” because if you don’t send it they can’t appreciate it!

Just catching up

It’s time for a coffee and cake somewhere. Your friend will feel you really want to meet up if you write a note, with even a time and place suggested….trust me, much more meaningful than a text and they’re less likely to forget a card and more likely to reply.

Wanted to make you laugh

Laughter is truly the best medicine and whether someone is ill, having a tough time or not that you know of, a humourous card will brighten up their day….just like it did yours when you picked the card.

Remember when…

Pyjama party…we had that pyjama party years ago? Doesn’t the one on the left look like….

It’s National Clean up your room day*…

…and I wanted to give you advance warning. Or chocolate truffles, ice creams, save the whale etc. Your friend will love the thought and might even frame the card! (*It’s May 10th by the way if you need to know…)

I’m a bit of a Mad Hatter

Happy Unbirthday! At least 364 days a year you can send these cards and let’s face it most of us would love more than one birthday a year. Or if you really are a Mad Hatter and love tea, then I have the perfect card!

It’s been a year since…

Whether it’s been a year since you walked along that beach or since they lost a loved one, such a thought will either bring back happy memories or remind them they aren’t forgotten in their grief.

No flowers allowed

With many hospital wards not allowing flowers any more a colourful card goes a long way to brightening up the hospital bedside cabinet!

Phoenix Trading greeting cardJust because

If none of the above apply, well then just because it’s a thoughtful thing to do. Pick the right greeting card and it will look good and do good!

Go on, make someone smile today, send a card.

To stock up on cards visit my UK shop, if you’re outside the UK, visit International Enquiries to find out how to get hold of some fabulous greetings cards.

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Watch “L309 Butterfly Baskets” on YouTube!

Our newest card ‘Butterfly Baskets’ will be sold in support of children’s hospice care through the charity Together for Short Lives. 50p from the sale of every card will support this worthy cause and each card is just £1.40 if you buy 10  or more assorted cards, otherwise it’s still just £1.75 which is great value for such a quality, innovative and stunning card.

I am ordering 100 for starters – how many would you like?

If you’d like to see how the card works, watch this 34 second clip!

https://youtu.be/_e7HlnNkGug

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The Perfect Cup of Tea – Fortnum & Mason

As it’s National Beverage Day I thought you’d like to know how to make the perfect cup of tea! Who better to ask than Fortnum and Mason?

The Perfect Cup of Tea

WS319_ceramics

Tea advice from the experts. You’re SO welcome.

Here’s all you need to know about the ‘right’ way to make tea. No ceremony necessary. First of all, we have assumed one is using leaf tea. You really and truly should. Secondly, not all leaves require the same approach. Green leaves may prefer a longer brewing time: Darjeeling performs shabbily with milk. But let’s describe the classic process of making a traditional “black” tea as found in most of Fortnum’s (and the world’s) most popular blends.

Here is a simple digest of what works.

Fill the kettle with fresh water from the tap. Yes, your grandmother was right: water that has been boiled already will affect the taste of the tea.

As it approaches the boil, warm the teapot by rinsing it out with hot water.

Treat the teapot to one rounded teaspoon (yes, or caddy spoon) of tea leaves for each person and one extra spoonful ‘for the pot’. That’s the orthodox rule, though many these days find it a little strong. You’re in charge here.

Just before the kettle water boils, pour into the pot. It doesn’t need to be stirred.

Leave to infuse for three to five minutes, depending on taste. Serve, using a tea strainer.

If making tea in a cup with a tea infuser, the same rule applies – one spoon of tea, use water just off the boil and infuse for 3-5 minutes.

To find out more including whether to put the milk in first or last read the rest of the article via The Perfect Cup of Tea – Fortnum & Mason.

So now we have that sorted – would you like to receive free products by hosting a Coffee and Cards?

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Did you know?

Who came up with Christmas cards?WS319_ceramics

Which country leads the way in greetings card design?

How much money goes to charity from Christmas cards?

What’s the average cost of a greetings card?

Answers to the above and more in my latest video – Did you know?

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Grammar Girl : Why Did People Stop Saying “Thou”? :: Quick and Dirty Tips ™

(I thought this was fascinating, a friend shared it via her FB page Barefoot in Belfast, she sells gorgeous children’s books by the way, and I thought with all the romantic poems we often write in cards it was interesting to see what happened to thee and thou, this is only part of the article, see the link at the end for the full thing, well worth a read!)

We know language changes—we don’t say thee and thou anymore—but have you ever wondered why? Often, it’s not clear, but there’s a particularly satisfying answer when it comes to these two pronouns.

A couple of weeks ago, after I talked about how the pronoun you fills so many roles, I started wondering why we stopped using thee and thou.

It turns out that English used to have formal and informal pronouns like many other languages. German has Sie and du, French has vous and tu, Spanish has usted and tú, and during Shakespeare’s time, English had thou and you and thee and you.

Thee and Thou Were English’s Informal Pronouns

Since thee and thou have survived mainly in religious and poetic writing, you may be surprised to learn that thee and thou were the informal pronouns. Yup. You was formal, and thou was informal.

In a book called The Personal Pronouns in the Germanic Languages, Stephen Howe says that in the fifteenth to sixteenth centuries, thou was generally used to address someone who was socially inferior or an intimate. For example, parents called their children thou, and children called their parents you, but then the use of thou sharply decreased in the seventeenth century, starting in London. Thou was used the longest in areas that were farthest from London, and in fact, it’s still used in a few regional dialects including those in Yorkshire and Cumbria, which are both quite a bit north of London.

When Social Status Became Unclear, People Started Using You More

The reason people stopped using thou (and thee) was that social status—whether you were considered upper class or lower class—became more fluid during this time. You had social climbers striving to talk like the upper class, so they used you all the time instead of thou, and since you couldn’t be as sure as you used to be about who was in what class, it was safer to use you instead of thou because you didn’t want to risk accidentally offending someone in the upper class by using the wrong pronoun. You didn’t want to call someone thou when you should have used you!

via Grammar Girl : Why Did People Stop Saying “Thou”? :: Quick and Dirty Tips ™.

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The Art of Handwriting – Is it Lost?

Cards lost art of handwriting

Have we lost the art of handwriting? I hope not. With social media being a part of our lives that it never was when I was young I see changes in what we teach our children. Quite rightly they learn how to touch type on a qwerty keyboard from an early age. But they still have their handwriting book too. How important is handwriting in a technical age? Does it matter anymore?

Despite the common perception that ‘no one sends cards anymore’ the opposite is true. According to a recent survey 95% of British households still send cards. So surely it’s important that what’s written in them is readable? Or is it?

I did a little research on the lost art of handwriting.Phoenix Trading

This article on The Art of Handwriting about letters by artists is worth a look just to see the handwriting. I’m not an artist so my handwriting leaves a lot to be desired but I just adore neat, artistic handrwriting.

Here is a very inspiring TED talk on the lost art of handwriting – you might be inspired to pick up pen and paper after listening to these shared memories.

Now, going back to my earlier complaint about poor handwriting, there might be an answer in this. A hi-tech pen that could improve my handwriting!

…and if you’re still not sure you need to bother brushing up on your handwriting then this 8 year old has a very good reason why it’s important – how else will he fill in his contract to be a major league player?!

So, is the art of handwriting important or not?

Does it matter if my scrawl looks pretty or is it enough just to be readable? It’s a well known fact that sending handwritten cards and notes has a positive impact on someone’s mental health. So perhaps I shouldn’t get too hung up on how good or bad my handwriting looks but worry more about if I am writing enough. After all the only way to improve my handwriting is to practise, practise, practise. I no longer have a handwriting jotter like my children at school so perhaps my best practice is to send more cards and letters.